Here’s Why You Need An ‘Accomplishments List’ for 2020

Instead of focusing on resolutions for 2021, Factory 45 Founder Shannon Lohr is here to share why she’s written an ‘Accomplishments List’ for 2020 (and why you should too.)

Woman writing in her journal

Right around this time each year, I traditionally share an “annual review” of what went well (and what didn’t go so well) in life and business.

I wrote this unconventional goal setting exercise last year, having no idea what would be in store for 2020.

And to be honest, it still feels weird to discuss revenue numbers and business accomplishments given the year we’ve all been through.

When I went through this exercise with a couple of entrepreneurial girlfriends at the beginning of the month, my list of “2020 accomplishments” surprised me.

 

I didn’t think there would be anything of real significance given the lack of consistent childcare and overall mental and emotional upheaval that was happening.

But when I really sat down to take the time to think about it, my “accomplishments list” wasn’t as meager as I expected.

And if you did this same exercise, I think it would surprise you too.

 

Because it turns out that what I considered “accomplishments” weren’t what I would have thought of before this year happened.

 

It included things like:

  • I set up an ongoing monthly charitable donation to Together Rising
  • Gained more awareness around racial inequity
  • Allocated over $3K/month to Black women business owners
  • Started a free podcast that benefits my friends and family

In 2019, these aren’t things that I would have labeled as accomplishments.

 

For me, the silver lining of 2020 is that it changed my definition of “success.” 

 

While revenue and sales goals are, of course, important to any healthy business — they’re not the only measure of success.

Maybe your list of accomplishments looks something like this:

  • Completed two online courses
  • Learned how to create graphics in Canva
  • Built a landing page
  • Joined an anti-racist book group
  • Started painting again

 

While those may seem like small things, when compared to your original 2020 goals, this year has certainly taught us that anything positive is worth celebrating.

Even if it looks like this:

  • Survived virtual learning with my kids
  • Kept my job
  • Didn’t divorce my partner
  • Created a plan to start my business in 2021

 

The point is, if you needed any permission to forget the big 2020 goals you may have set for yourself — this is it.

 

Instead, take the time to actually sit down and write out anything and everything you accomplished this year.

“Learned how to bake bread.” Done.

It’s a worthwhile exercise (for so many reasons), but it’s also an investment in 2021.

It sets an intention, rather than prioritizing lofty goals that may seem too uncertain right now.

And maybe an intention is all you need.

 

Here’s to a new year,

Shannon

 

Published with permission from Factory 45 by Shannon Lohr.

Shannon Lohr works with aspiring entrepreneurs all over the globe through her Factory 45 program to launch sustainable & ethical fashion brands the right way, from the start.

 

 

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